Egypt in the aftermath of the Jasmine Revolution

The chaos in Egypt, following the uprising in Tunisia, has become the focus of international politics. Egyptians are in the streets of Cairo and other cities, revolting against the Mubarak regime, but an end to Mubarak may not mean an end to the military control of the government as this article explains. The article shows how the military in Egypt has such a strong influence on the Egyptian state apparatus; it mentions “Egypt’s government is not so much a Mubarak government as it is a military government”. So what happened in Tunisia may not happen here.

As it has been clear so far, the Americans have no interest in abandoning their long time ally in the Middle East; they fear his removal from office may leave a power vacuum, which they do not want to happen. Israel and China are already voicing their support for Mubarak’s stay for a while until he secures a smooth transition of power to his potential successor, the vice president—that for the sake of stability and peace, both within the country and in the region. In particular, Israeli leaders have been busy lobbying their Western counterparts, including those in the US, to back Mubarak who has been instrumental in keeping regional stability in the Middle East; Egypt under Mubarak has been a good friend of the Jewish State of Israel. In contrast, the Egyptian people want the complete collapse of the Mubarak regime. We will soon or later see the fate of this troubled country. But whatever happens there, let’s hope Muslim radicals, who desire Islamic Republic of Egypt, will not exploit this opportunity and Mubarak, too, leaves office without unnecessary bloodshed.
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